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Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

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In Stock

Available for Delivery

UK Friendly

Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

test 1Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 2Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 3Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 4 Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen
test 1Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 2Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 3Case Stockman Amber Bone Pentest 4 Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

18+ Age Restriction Icon

In Stock

Available for Delivery

£63.95

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Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

Case Stockman Amber Bone Pen

£63.95

Description

Classic three blade knife from the masters of the pocket knife, W.R. Case and Sons. This model has a clip, pen and sheepsfoot blade made from Chrome Vanadium carbon steel. The handle is Amber bone with nickel silver bolsters. Each blade is under three inches long and non-locking making it legal to carry within the UK at the owners discretion

Specification

Code CA079
Limited Edition: No
Brand: Case
Blade Material: Chrome vanadium carbon steel
Blade Length (cm): 6.7
Blade Thickness (cm): 0.2
Closed Length (cm): 9.20
Blade Type: Plain
Blade Finish: Polished
Handle Material: Bone
Handle Detail: Amber Bone
Lock Type: Non-locking
UK Friendly Carry: Yes
Sheath: No
Pocket Clip: No
Product Weight (g): 68

Reviews

  1. Case No 32 pattern Stockman. Superb!Review by
    Rating
    The difference between "frame" and "pattern" may at first seem confusing or insignificant. Years ago, I never knew either of the terms. If I liked the pocket knife as a good user, that was enough.

    The frame, in very simple terms, is the shape of the liners, and of the spacer(s), if present. The bolsters (metal end bits) and scales (handles) and springs all follow the form, the shape of, the liners, and complete the exterior appearance of the pocket knife. So the same frame may, depending on the number of blades, be a Jack Knife, or a Stockman, or even just a single bladed knife. A Buck Solitaire is descended from their Stockman, for example. On a jack knife, a longer main blade and a shorter secondary blade both pivot at the same end. A Case Small Texas Jack, a truly fine jack knife, is a good classic example of this.

    Adding a third smaller blade to the other end of the same layer as the small secondary blade of a jack knife makes the pocket knife into a different pattern, a Stockman. Or, by placing the small secondary blade in the same layer as the larger main blade, it then becomes the classic Pen Knife pattern, with both blades supported by the one backspring. Case pocket knives identify the model, or the pattern, by 3 lines of text, often (but not absolutely always) on the far side of a secondary blade, if present. That is, opposite the shield (badge) side of the knife. The shield side, or near side, is normally called the "mark" side and the opposite side, or far side, the "pile" side. Fun and informative to look into, if you want to.

    Case's 3 lines on this one are:
    USA (Bradford, Pennsylvania).
    63032 (6 for bone, the scale material; 3, the number of blades; 32, or 032, the frame designation).
    CV (Chrome Vanadium carbon steel; tool steel blades).

    The Case Small Texas Jack, reads similarly, but 62032 for the middle line, referring to two blades, the main clip and the pen blade.

    Yet both models use the same frame. They are identical in size and shape, length width and depth, and surprisingly, mine are both exactly 63 grams in weight. One has two blades, one has three.

    The No 32 pattern Stockman is a wonderful example of its type. Marginally thinner and lighter than the similar Case No 18 pattern Stockman (their most popular Stockman), the No 32 seems sleeker by comparison. The squared bolsters with their "pinched" ends, are slimmer than the No 18's rounded counterparts; yet, for me, the No 32 pattern is not the least bit uncomfortable. Either in the pocket or in use.

    The main clip blade is a good size, with a fine tip. And completely UK friendly.

    The 32 pattern Stockman retains the Pen blade of the Small Texas Jack, moving it to the left hand end, looking at the shield side, and adds the Sheepfoot blade one expects to see on a Stockman, as the secondary blade. Because of this, the No 32 has both of the smaller blades I actually prefer in a Stockman. There is no Spey blade here. Given the choice between a Pen blade and a Spey blade, most of the time I find the Pen blade more useful, in daily life. I haven't neutered a critter yet, and it is most unlikely that I ever will. So whilst the Spey blade can substitute for a Pen blade in many cases, the finer tip of the Pen makes it my choice. Except for spoon carving or similar scooping applications. Then the Spey is quite useful.

    A No 18 Sheepfoot blade sits high, on current production models, allowing it to be pinched and opened quickly and easily, even if your hands are cold and wet, without locating the nail nick, and quicker than conscious thought. Easier to do than say. Some don't like the look of the "easy access" No 18's Sheepfoot. Some reviews here have expressed that opinion. I used to feel that way too. Actual use changed my mind.

    The No 32 is a different take on the height of the closed Sheepfoot. One cannot "pinch open" it, since it sits lower when closed. Just use the nail nick. In fact, with minimal practice it's possible to deploy the Sheepfoot blade with one hand, if you are blessed (cursed) with sufficiently long fingernails. This is the right hand method. Begin with the middle finger's nail in the nick, and your thumb opposite the nick and start to open the blade, then pinch the blade between your thumb and index finger once you can do so, and push off against your hip or thigh, or catch the edge of your pocket, to complete opening your Stockman. Practice, with care, and you will have a useful alternative if ever you need your pocket knife but don't have both hands free. This technique works for many slipjoint folders, unless the backspring is too strong to allow it.

    In a review for Case's No 18 pattern Stockman I mentioned a few things I learned over time. I won't repeat it all here; hopefully the superb No 18 will continue to be available in future. Synopsis: don't be overly concerned about blade play. It is much easier to correct than you may think. Well worth learning how to do. If the shield falls out (very rare) just cement it back in place. Blade rub is very common on overlapping blades, especially in the same layer. Don't worry - your pocket knife will still perform. Even bad instances can be corrected or lessened with care, forethought, and patience. Natural materials like bone may have or develop imperfections. Don't worry about it. Food safe mineral oil is great for blades and joints. A tiny bit occasionally helps the bone scales too. Bone ages well, and seemingly garish colours or contrasts will richly mellow with time.

    Don't be put off by wire edges, burrs on the edges of the blades. Very easy to remove. Strop your blades to bring out the best in them.

    Don't pry with your pocket knife. Don't lend it out. Not unless you really, really trust the person. Don't put it away dirty or wet. The carbon steel will darken over time. Let it. A patina is a good thing, if oiled occasionally. Or just keep your blades bright. Many do.

    Case's No 32 pattern Stockman is a lovely traditional slipjoint pocket knife. Made for daily use and crafted to be an heirloom. WR Case is a very popular choice for collectors. This one explains why. Old fashioned charm and everyday usefulness in a compact and sturdy example of cutlery art.
    (Posted on )
  2. Nearly a good knifeReview by
    Rating
    I purchased one of these in the US a few months ago and it is in many ways a nice knife, with blades that can take and hold a good edge and a good, if rather shiney, look to it. Size is good for a pocket knife and it feels solid, with a good spring action from open and closed.
    I have two major problems with it; blade alignment is slightly off so that 2 of the blades rub when closing (scratching up the blades) and that the corners on the metal bolster dig into your hand when cutting with it. This prevents me using it for more than opening the odd package. Grind was rather jagged out of the box, but was easily fixable. Nearly very good.
    (Posted on )

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